Fraction Freebies!

We've been working on fractions this week, and while my kiddos seem to be getting it (and are really enjoying learning about fractions), I've noticed that many of them are not comfortable referring to fractions in word form. Instead of saying three fourths, they'll say "three out of four"........or instead of five sixths, they'll say "five out of six". Technically, that is correct, but they need to learn to say one fourth, two sevenths, five eighths, etc.

I made a couple games to help them practice. The first game is an I Have Who Has. In this game, kiddos will need to identify the number and word forms as well as the model. The second game is a simple concentration game......matching the model to the word form. I'll be doing the I Have Who Has a couple times next week and adding the concentration game to our workstations for the week.

Just click on the pictures to download your copies from Dropbox.



6 comments:

  1. This is great. Fractions (halves & fourths) are a CCS but not in my math text so we incorporate it and add our own stuff and it's hard to get fraction stuff on a good level for my kiddos.

    Brenda
    You Might Be a First Grader...

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  2. Thank you so much for stopping by and following my blog! I am one more follower closer to my 100 because of you and I appreciate that more than you know :) your blog is just fabulous. Thank you again! I'm happy to be your newest follower!

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  3. What a great post!
    I can't wait to try your fraction units with my firsties!
    Thanks so much for sharing!
    So excited to be a new follower of such a fun blog!
    Julie
    Ms. Marciniak's First Grade Critter Cafe

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  4. I love this. I teach fourth grade, but it would work with a small group who are struggling.

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  5. What a great post and cute freebie! Thanks!
    Chris
    Autism Classroom News

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  6. I teach 6th grade resource math and intervention math classes. The kids are still unsure of how to name fractions based on a picture, let alone different representations (circles, sets, triangles, etc). Thanks for posting. Looking forward to using this year!

    Erin
    Shenanigans in 6th Grade Math

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